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Biggest problems faced by farmers in India?

Posted by my BigHaat on

1. Small and fragmented land-holdings:
The seemingly abundance of net sown area of 141.2 million hectares and total cropped area of 189.7 million hectares (1999-2000) pales into insignificance when we see that it is divided into economically unviable small and scattered holdings.
The average size of holdings was 2.28 hectares in 1970-71 which was reduced to 1.82 hectares in 1980-81 and 1.50 hectares in 1995-96. The size of the holdings will further decrease with the infinite Sub-division of the land holdings.

2. Seeds:
Seed is a critical and basic input for attaining higher crop yields and sustained growth in agricultural production. Distribution of assured quality seed is as critical as the production of such seeds. Unfortunately, good quality seeds are out of reach of the majority of farmers, especially small and marginal farmers mainly because of exorbitant prices of better seeds.

3. Manures, Fertilizers and Biocides:
Indian soils have been used for growing crops over thousands of years without caring much for replenishing. This has led to depletion and exhaustion of soils resulting in their low productivity. The average yields of almost all the crops are among t e lowest in the world. This is a serious problem which can be solved by using more manures and fertilizers.

4. Irrigation:
Although India is the second largest irrigated country of the world after China, only one-third of the cropped area is under irrigation. Irrigation is the most important agricultural input in a tropical monsoon country like India where rainfall is uncertain, unreliable and erratic India cannot achieve sustained progress in agriculture unless and until more than half of the cropped area is brought under assured irrigation.

5. Lack of mechanisation:
In spite of the large scale mechanisation of agriculture in some parts of the country, most of the agricultural operations in larger parts are carried on by human hand using simple and conventional tools and implements like wooden plough, sickle, etc.

6. Soil erosion:
Large tracts of fertile land suffer from soil erosion by wind and water. This area must be properly treated and restored to its original fertility.

7. Agricultural Marketing:
Agricultural marketing still continues to be in a bad shape in rural India. In the absence of sound marketing facilities, the farmers have to depend upon local traders and middlemen for the disposal of their farm produce which is sold at throw-away price.

8. Scarcity of capital:
Agriculture is an important industry and like all other industries it also requires capital. The role of capital input is becoming more and more important with the advancement of farm technology. Since the agriculturists’ capital is locked up in his lands and stocks, he is obliged to borrow money for stimulating the tempo of agricultural production.

Now, the use of technology can be effectively done in various manners in order to help out farmers. Such as:

  1. Direct transfer of capital by the government to the farmers which has already got initiated by our PM NaMo under the Jan Dhan Yojna.
  2. Agricultural Marketing through means of modern technology like mobile phones will be another step forward.
  3. Educating farmers about techniques to avoid soil erosion and increasing harvests through means of using suitable fertilisers by reaching out to them through means of advanced technology will also be a big step forward.

For further detailed discussion visit  


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3 comments

  • Nice n useful post. Actually this is a post which should be liked.

    Mona Pragya on
  • Nice n useful post . Actually this is a post which should be liked.

    Mona Pragya on
  • Nice n useful post . Actually this is a post which shoulb be liked.

    Mona Pragya on

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